Council on Foreign Relations Member James R. Schlesinger and the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS)

On Thursday March 27, 2014 Council on Foreign Relation James R. Schlesinger died. The Council on Foreign Relations has run the US government for 92 years. The CFR controls the central bank and runs the nation’s Military Industrial Complex. It profits from wars that go on forever. The wars cause nations to go into massive debt to CFR International Bankers who run the IMF and World Bank. James R. Schlesinger was a major devil in the details of CFR forever war. The CFR run Carlyle Corporation makes trillions of forever war bucks from weapons, munitions, food, uniform and other sales resulting from death and destruction. They make more profits by going in and rebuilding what they have destroyed. If you read the New York Times Schlesinger Obituary you will find that it doesn’t mention the Council on Foreign Relations once. The following background information regarding Schlesinger will help make clear how powerful this evil group of ruling elites is. The Times Obituary follows it, revised to make the CFR-Schlesinger connection visible.

Schlesinger served under three Presidents, Richard Nixon, CFR member Gerald Ford, and CFR member Jimmy Carter.

Richard Nixon appointed over 100 CFR members [14] to serve in his Administration. CFR member Gerald R. Ford retained these members and added some more incuding CFR member William Simon (Secretary of Treasury), and CFR member Nelson Rockefeller (Vice-President). Jimmy Carter who became a CFR member in 1983 appointed over 60 CFR members to serve in his Administration including: Walter Mondale (Vice-President), Zbigniew Brzeznski(National Security Advisor), CyrusR. Vance (Secretary of State), W. Michael Blumenthal (Secretary of Treasury), HaroldBrown (Secretary of Defense), Stansfield Turner (Director of the CIA), Gen. David Jones (Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff).

In recent years CFR member Schlesinger was chairman of the Miter Corporation and a member of the board of Miter’s Board of Trustees. Other CFR Miter Board of Trustee members are

Mr. Charles S. Robb Virginia’s 64th Governor and US Senator, Ms. Michèle Flournoy Under Secretary of Defense for Policy from February 2009 to February 2012, General Montgomery C. Meigs, U.S. Army (Ret.), Elizabeth Rindskopf Parker General Counsel for NSA and CIA, and Dr. John J. Hamre is president and chief executive officer of the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS).

CFR member Schlesinger was also a trustee of the CSIS. The following was found on the website for the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) [http://www.csis.org/]. The website tells us,

“The mission of CSIS is policy impact.. Its goal is to inform and shape selected policy decisions in government and the private sector to meet the increasingly complex and difficult challenges that leaders will confront in the next century.”1

The CSIS website tells us it achieves its mission in three ways:

“By generating strategic analysis – CSIS is a source of scholarly analysis on international public policy issues…

By convening policymakers and other influential parties – CSIS has a long-standing reputation for bringing together leaders from government, the private sector, and academia from around the world…

By building structures for policy action – CSIS mobilizes government and private-sector leaders in action commissions and other high-level groups and then moves policymakers to take concrete actions.”2

Propaganda, is the effort to alter the picture to which men respond, to substitute one social pattern for another. Propaganda is used to create false reality worlds using sleight of mind. Psycho-political operations are propaganda campaigns. Strategic psycho-political operations focus propaganda at powerful individuals, or small groups of people capable of influencing public opinion or the government of a particular country. Tactical psycho-political operations focus propaganda at the masses by interference in specific events, their comments, and their appeals through mass communication media ( i.e. newspapers, radio, television, textbooks, educational material, art, entertainment, etc. ). Both forms of propaganda are used to manipulate public opinion to attain foreign policy goals in a given period. If the operations are designed to conceal both the operation and the sponsor the operation is clandestine. If the operations are designed only to conceal only the sponsor the operation is covert.3

Conspicuously absent from the CSIS web-site are links of CSIS members to the Council on Foreign Relations. Once the links are added it becomes clear that the CSIS is run by the Council on foreign Relations. CSIS is part of the Council on Foreign Relations propaganda machine, that focuses well planned psycho-political operations at powerful individuals and the masses.

CSIS convenes 700-800 meetings, seminars, and conference each year in Washington and throughout the world. These are strategic psycho-political operations meant to influence powerful individuals at home and abroad. CSIS generates thousands of media appearances, articles, and background contacts annually. These are tactical psycho-political operations meant to influence mass public opinion.4

When the CSIS informs and shapes selected policy decisions in government and the private sector they do so to further the interests of Council on Foreign Relations members, and members of CFR branch organizations in other nations, not the American people.

Founded in 1962 and located in Washington, D.C., CSIS is a private, tax-exempt institution. Its research is non-partisan and non-proprietary. On January 1, 1999, Sam Nunn will take over for CFR member Anne Armstrong as chairman of its Board of Trustees, and CFR member Robert Zoellick will assume the presidency as CFR member David M. Abshire moves on as CSIS chancellor.5

Center for Strategic and International Studies list of “Who Leads CSIS” contains 63 people, 35 are Council on Foreign Relations members . Of the Center’s staff of 80 research specialists at least 20 are Council on Foreign Relations members.

Contributions from more than 300 corporations, foundations, and individuals constitute 85% of the revenues required to meet the Center’s budget, which in 1997 was $17 million. The remaining funds come from endowment income, government contracts, and publication sales. 6

The Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) is a public policy research institution dedicated to analysis and policy impact. CSIS is the only institution of its kind that maintains resident experts on all the world’s major geographical regions. It also covers key functional areas, such as international finance, U.S. domestic and economic policy, and U.S. foreign policy and national security issues. 7

The Center’s gateway to Asia is the Honolulu-based Pacific Forum CSIS. It is the hub of network of 20 research institutes around the Pacific Rim. Forum programs encompass current and emerging political, security, economic, and business issues. CFR member Brent Scowcroft chairs its Board of Governors and James A. Kelly is its president.8

CSIS Counselor CFR member Henry Kissinger chairs the semiannual meetings of The International Councillors. This group of international business leaders discuss the implications of the changing economic and strategic environment. 9

CSIS launched the National Security in the Twenty-First Century Project last year. It is co-chaired by CFR member Harold Brown and CFR member James Schlesinger. It promises a comprehensive look at what must be done to provide credible, capable defense of the nation, its interests, and its allies. The project focuses on four critical, strategic dimensions of future U.S. national security: resources, strategy and force structure, information warfare, U.S. national security decision-making. Resources for National Security: With the 1995 publication of Defense in the Late 1990’s: Avoiding the Train Wreck, CSIS was one of the first policy institutions to warn that the American drive to reduce the budget deficit threatens to severely undermine U.S. military capabilities unless entitlement spending is also cut or taxes are increased.10

Revisiting the National Security Act of 1947 is an ongoing comprehensive study overseen by former secretaries of defense CFR member Harold Brown and CFR member James Schlesinger. The study was launched eighteen months ago when CSIS first argued the pressing need to revise the 1947 Act to reflect the changing nature of U.S. foreign and defense requirements and the changing character of the tools at the disposal of U.S. policy-makers for meeting those requirements. The study will conclude in a published report in late 1998.11

CFR members on CSIS Board of Trustees include:

Council on Foreign Relations member Anne Armstrong*, former U.S. Ambassador to Great Britain; Chairman, CSIS Board of Trustees

Council on Foreign Relations member Maurice R. Greenberg*Chairman, American International Group, Inc.; Vice Chairman CSIS Board of Trustees

Council on Foreign Relations member William A. Schreyer Chairman Emeritus, Merrill Lynch& Co., Inc.; Chairman, Executive Committee CSIS Board of Trustees

Council on Foreign Relations member David M. Abshire*, member CSIS Board of Trustees

Council on Foreign Relations member William E. Brock, member CSIS Board of Trustees

Council on Foreign Relations member Harold Brown, member CSIS Board of Trustees

Council on Foreign Relations member Zbigniew Brzezinski, member CSIS Board of Trustees

Council on Foreign Relations member Joseph T. Gorman, member CSIS Board of Trustees

Council on Foreign Relations member Henry A. Kissinger, member CSIS Board of Trustees

Council on Foreign Relations member John C. Sawhill, member CSIS Board of Trustees

Council on Foreign Relations member James R. Schlesinger, member CSIS Board of Trustees

Council on Foreign Relations member Brent Scowcroft, member CSIS Board of Trustees

Council on Foreign Relations member R. James Woolsey, member CSIS Board of Trustees

Council on Foreign Relations member Amos A. Jordan, Emeritus, member CSIS Board of Trustees

Council on Foreign Relations member Leonard H. Marks, Emeritus, member CSIS Board of Trustees

Council on Foreign Relations member Robert S. Strauss, Emeritus, member CSIS Board of Trustees

CSIS Advisory Board – The Advisory Board is composed of both public and private sector policymakers, including 14 members of Congress.

The Board is cochaired by Council on Foreign Relations member Zbigniew Brzezinski and Carla Hills.

Council on Foreign Relations member David M. Abshire, Chancellor (effective January 1, 1999)

Council on Foreign Relations member Robert B Zoellick, President and CEO (effective January 1, 1999)

Council on Foreign Relations member Richard M. Fairbanks III, Managing Director for Domestic and International Issues

Council on Foreign Relations member William J. Taylor, Jr., Senior Vice President for International Security Affairs

Council on Foreign Relations member Erik R. Peterson, Senior Vice President and Director of Studies

CFR CSIS Counselors are world-class strategists who have formerly held top-level government posts. They bring to the Center and extensive reserve of expertise and experience.

Council on Foreign Relations member William E. Brock

Council on Foreign Relations member Harold Brown

Council on Foreign Relations member Zbigniew Brzezinski

Council on Foreign Relations member Henry A. Kissinger

Council on Foreign Relations member James R. Schlesinger

CFR CSIS Advisers – Senior advisers and associates are an integral part of the CSIS family. They provide substantive counsel and input on the full range of Center projects.

Council on Foreign Relations member, Fred C. Iklé (in residence), CSIS Distinguished Senior Scholars

Council on Foreign Relations member Bernard Lewis (Princeton University) CSIS Distinguished Senior Scholars

Council on Foreign Relations member William J. Crowe. Jr., CSIS Distinguished Senior Adviser

Council on Foreign Relations member J. Carter Bees, CSIS Senior Advisers

Council on Foreign Relations member Richard R. Burt, CSIS Senior Advisers

Council on Foreign Relations member Arnaud de Borchgrave, CSIS Senior Advisers

Council on Foreign Relations member Diana Lady Dougan, CSIS Senior Advisers

Council on Foreign Relations member Dante B. Fascell, CSIS Senior Advisers

Council on Foreign Relations member Amos A. Jordan, CSIS Senior Advisers

Council on Foreign Relations member Max M. Kampelman, CSIS Senior Advisers

Council on Foreign Relations member Robert H. Kupperman, CSIS Senior Advisers

Council on Foreign Relations member David McCurdy, CSIS Senior Advisers

Council on Foreign Relations member Stephen J. Solarz, CSIS Senior Advisers12

CFR CSIS research specialists

Council on Foreign Relations Member David Manker Abshire, President

Council on Foreign Relations Member M. Delal Baer, Deputy Director, Americas Program, Director, Mexico Project

Council on Foreign Relations Member Richard Burt, Senior Adviser

Council on Foreign Relations Member Joseph J. Collins Senior Fellow, Political-Military Studies

Council on Foreign Relations Member L. Gray Cowan, Senior Associate, African Studies

Council on Foreign Relations Member Arnaud de Borchgrave, Project Director, Global

Council on Foreign Relations Member Diana Lady Dougan Senior Adviser and Chair, International Communications Studies

Council on Foreign Relations Member Richard M. Fairbanks III Managing Director, Domestic and International Issues

Council on Foreign Relations Member Charles M. Herzfeld Senior Associate

Council on Foreign Relations Member Shireen T. Hunter, Program Director, Islamic Studies

Council on Foreign Relations Member Fred C. Iklé Distinguished Scholar

Council on Foreign Relations Member Amos A. Jordan, President Emeritus, Senior Adviser, Pacific Forum/CSIS

Council on Foreign Relations Member Max M. Kampelman, Senior Adviser

Council on Foreign Relations Member Judith Kipper, Codirector, Middle East Studies Program

Council on Foreign Relations Member Helen Kitchen Chairman, African Studies

Council on Foreign Relations Member Robert H. Kupperman Senior Adviser

Council on Foreign Relations Member Edward N. Luttwak Chair, New Italy Project

Council on Foreign Relations Member Richard W. Murphy, Senior Associate

Council on Foreign Relations Member Erik R. Peterson, Senior Vice President and Director of Studies

Council on Foreign Relations Member Stephen J. Solarz, Senior Adviser

Council on Foreign Relations Member William J. Taylor Jr., Senior Vice President, International Security Affairs, Director, Political-Military Studies

Council on Foreign Relations Member Howard J. Wiarda, Senior Associate, Political-Military Studies

Council on Foreign Relations Member Dov S. Zakheim, Senior Associate, Political-Military Studies

Council on Foreign Relations Member Robert B. Zoellick, Senior Associate13

[1] What is the CSIS Mission?- http://www.csis.org/html/csismiss.html , 09/13/98

[2] How does CSIS implement this mission? http://www.csis.org/html/csismiss.html#implement , 09/13/98

[3] Pollock, Daniel C Project Director & Editors De Mclaurin,Ronald, Rosenthal, Carl F., Skillings, Sarah A., The Art and Science of Psychological Operations: Case Studies of Military Application Volume One, Pamphlet No. 725-7-2, DA Pam 525-7-2, Headquarters Department of the Army Washington, DC, 1 April 1976 Vol 2 pg 825 – Ways and Means of US Ideological Expansion, By A. Valyuzhenich, bio lists him as a soviet analyst; no further information available — the article was printed in International Affairs (Moscow) magazine February 1971, pp. 63-68;

[4] How does CSIS communicate? http://www.csis.org/html/csiscomm.html , 09/13/98

 

[5] What is CSIS? http://www.csis.org/html/mission1.html , 09/13/98

[6] Who funds CSIS?http://www.csis.org/html/csiscomm.html#fund , 09/13/98

[7] What is CSIS? http://www.csis.org/html/mission1.html , 09/13/98

[8] ibid

[9] How is CSIS Organized? The International Councillors, http://www.csis.org/html/csisorg.html , 09/13/98

[10] Political and Military Studies, National Security Priorities in the 21st Century and Military Culture, http://www.csis.org/polmil/ , 09/13/98

[11] Political and Military Studies, Revisiting the National Security Act: , http://www.csis.org/polmil/ , 09/13/98

[12] Who leads CSIS? (CSIS) http://www.csis.org/html/csislead.html  , 09/13/98

[13] CSIS Scholars, http://www.csis.org/html/4scholars.html , 09/13/98

[14] : CFR members serving in Nixon/Ford Administrations : George Ball (Foreign Policy Consultant to the State Department), Dr. Harold Brown (General Advisory Committee of the U.S. Committee of the U.S.   Arms Control and Disarmament Agency, and the senior member of the U.S. delegation for talks with Russia on SALT), Dr. Arthur Burns (Chairman of the Federal Reserve), C. Fred Bergsten (Operations Staff of the National SecurityCouncil), C. Douglas Dillon (General Advisory Committee of the U.S. Arms Control and Disarmament Agency), Richard N. Cooper (Operations Staff of the National Security Council), Gen. Andrew J. Goodpaster (Supreme Allied Commander in Europe), John W. Gardner (Board of Directors, National Center for Volunteer Action), Elliot L. Richardson (Under Secretary of State, Secretary of Defense, Attorney General; and Secretary of Health, Education and Welfare), David Rockefeller (Task Force on International Development), Nelson A. Rockefeller (head of the Presidential Mission to Ascertain the Views of Leaders in the Latin America Countries), Rodman Rockefeller (Member, Advisory Council for Minority Enterprise), Dean Rusk (General Advisory Committee of the U.S. Arms Control and Disarmament Agency), Gerald Smith (Director, Arms Control and Disarmament Agency), Cyrus Vance (General Advisory Committee of the U.S. Arms Control and Disarmament Agency), Richard Gardner (member of the Commission on International Trade and Investment Policy), Sen. Jacob K. Javits (Representative to the 24th Session of the General Assembly of the UN), Henry A. Kissinger (Secretary of State, Harvard professor who was Rockefeller’s personal advisor on foreign affairs, openly advocating a “New World Order”), Henry Cabot Lodge (Chief Negotiator of the Paris Peace Talks), Douglas MacArthur II (Ambassador to Iran), John J. McCloy (Chairman of the General Advisory Committee of the U.S. Arms Control and Disarmament Agency), Paul H. Nitze (senior member of the U.S. delegation for the talks with Russia on SALT), John Hay Whitney (member of the Board of Directors for the Corporation for Public Broadcasting), George P. Shultz (Secretary of the Treasury), William Simon (Secretary of Treasury), Stanley R. Resor (Secretary of the Army), William E. Colby (Director of the CIA), Peter G. Peterson (Secretary of Commerce), James Lynn (Housing Secretary), Paul McCracken (chief economic aide), Charles Yost (UN Ambassador), Harlan Cleveland (NATO Ambassador), Jacob Beam (USSR Ambassador), David Kennedy (Secretary of Treasury)

 

James R. Schlesinger, Willful Aide to Three Presidents, Is Dead at 85

By ROBERT D. McFADDENMARCH 27, 2014

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CFR member James R. Schlesinger, right, with CFR member Henry A. Kissinger and CFR member President Gerald R. Ford in 1974. Credit Consolidated News Pictures, via Getty Images

CFR member James R. Schlesinger, a tough Cold War strategist who served as secretary of defense under Presidents Richard M. Nixon and CFR member Gerald R. Ford and became the nation’s first secretary of energy under CFR member President Jimmy Carter, died on Thursday in Baltimore. He was 85.

His death, at the Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, was confirmed by his daughter Ann Schlesinger, who said the cause was complications of pneumonia. He lived in Arlington, Va.

A brilliant, often abrasive Harvard-educated economist, CFR member Mr. Schlesinger went to Washington in 1969 as an obscure White House budget official. Over the next decade he became chairman of the Atomic Energy Commission, director of Central Intelligence, a cabinet officer for three presidents (two of whom fired him), a thorn to congressional leaders and a controversial national public figure.

His tenure at the Pentagon was little more than two years, from 1973 to 1975, but it was a time of turmoil and transition. Soviet nuclear power was rising menacingly. The war in Vietnam was in its final throes, and United States military prestige and morale had sunk to new lows. Congress was wielding an ax on a $90 billion defense budget. And the Watergate scandal was enveloping the White House.

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CFR member James R. Schlesinger in 2004. Credit Stephen Jaffe/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

In the days leading up to Nixon’s resignation in August 1974, CFR member Mr. Schlesinger, as he confirmed years later, became so worried that Nixon was unstable that he instructed the military not to react to White House orders, particularly on nuclear arms, unless cleared by him or CFR member Secretary of State Henry A. Kissinger. He also drew up plans to deploy troops in Washington in the event of any problems with a peaceful presidential succession.

CFR member Mr. Schlesinger, a Republican with impressive national security and nuclear power credentials, took a hard line with Congress, and the Kremlin, demanding increased budgets for defense and insisting that America’s security depended on nuclear and conventional arsenals at least as effective as the Soviet Union’s.

With Europe as a potential focal point for war, he urged stronger North Atlantic Treaty Organization forces to counter Soviet allies in the Warsaw Pact. His nuclear strategy envisioned retaliatory strikes on Soviet military targets, but not population centers, to limit the chances of what he called “uncontrolled escalation” and mutual “assured destruction.”

Beyond strategic theories, he dealt with a series of crises, including the 1973 Middle East war, when Arab nations attacked Israel, prompting an American airlift of matériel to Israel; an invasion of Cyprus by Turkish forces, leading to an arms embargo of Turkey, a NATO partner; and the Mayaguez episode, in which Cambodian forces seized an unarmed American freighter, prompting rescue and retaliation operations that saved 39 freighter crewmen but cost the lives of 41 American servicemen.

After succeeding Nixon, CFR member Ford, for stability, retained the CFR packed cabinet, including CFR member Mr. Schlesinger. But the president and CFR member Mr. Schlesinger were soon at loggerheads. CFR member Ford favored “leniency” for 50,000 draft evaders after the Vietnam War. CFR member Mr. Schlesinger, like Nixon, had opposed amnesty. Unlike CFR member Mr. Schlesinger, CFR member Ford was willing to compromise on defense budgets, and he recoiled at CFR member Mr. Schlesinger’s harsh criticisms of congressional leaders. These were not grave policy disputes, but the two were personally incompatible.

“There was a tension,” CFR member Mr. Ford acknowledged later.

CFR member Mr. Schlesinger’s blunt talk and uncompromising ways seemed insubordinate to Ford, and struck many White House officials as arrogant and patronizing. Besides his prickly relations with the president, CFR member Mr. Schlesinger differed with CFR member Mr. Kissinger over nuclear strategy, aid to Israel and other issues. In November 1975, after 28 months in office, he was dismissed.

While often criticized by political opponent and in the press, CFR member Mr. Schlesinger was viewed by many historians as an able defense secretary who modernized weapons systems and maintained America’s military stature against rising Soviet competition.

In his 1976 presidential campaign, CFR member Mr. Carter consulted CFR member Mr. Schlesinger and was impressed. Taking the White House in 1977, CFR member Mr. Carter named him his energy adviser and, after the Energy Department was created in a merger of 50 agencies, appointed him its first secretary. The only Republican in the CFR packed Carter cabinet, he was in charge of 20,000 employees and a $10 billion budget.

CFR member Mr. Schlesinger, an outspoken advocate of nuclear power, shared with CFR member Mr. Carter a belief that fossil fuels were destined for exhaustion, and warned that Arab oil supplies were unreliable. As oil prices rose and acute shortages and long lines at gasoline pumps formed, he and CFR member Mr. Carter endorsed conservation, tax incentives and synthetic fuels. The crisis passed, but not the energy problems.

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CFR member Mr. Schlesinger at his swearing-in as secretary of energy under CFR member President Jimmy Carter in 1977. His wife, Rachel, is at right. Credit Bob Daugherty/Associated Press

While he helped establish the new department and developed proposals intended to alter life in a nation addicted to enormous energy consumption, CFR member Mr. Schlesinger’s performance was widely criticized. Congressional opposition contributed to his departure in a 1979 cabinet shake-up by CFR member President Carter.

“In that administration, for some strange reason, I was the voice of experience, or the only voice of experience,” CFR member Mr. Schlesinger said years later for an oral history project. “I’m not sure whether that was a good thing or a bad thing. It was a mixed virtue, because that meant that in some sense I shared the contamination of the past and therefore my views, while they were interesting, and useful, had to be viewed with suspicion because they were views from the pre-1976 past.”

CFR member Mr. Schlesinger resumed writing and speaking, served on commissions and advisory panels, testified before Congress and became a businessman and a perennial consultant to presidents. He led inquiries into the safekeeping of nuclear weapons, the abuse of detainees at the Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq, prisoner interrogations at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, and other issues.

“There was sadism on the night shift at Abu Ghraib, sadism that was certainly not authorized,” he said in announcing the findings of Abu Ghraib inquiry in 2004. “It was kind of ‘Animal House’ on the night shift.”

CFR member James Rodney Schlesinger was born in New York City on Feb. 15, 1929, the son of Julius and Rhea Schlesinger, immigrants from Austria and Russia respectively. He was raised in a Jewish household but became a Lutheran as an adult. He attended Horace Mann School in the Bronx and Harvard, where he earned a bachelor’s degree in 1950, a master’s in 1952 and a doctorate in 1956, all in economics.

In 1954 he married Rachel Mellinger, a Radcliffe student. Mrs. Schlesinger died in 1995. CFR member Mr. Schlesinger is survived by his sons Charles, William, Thomas and James Jr.; his daughters, Cora, Ann, Emily and Clara; and 11 grandchildren.

From 1955 to 1963, CFR member Mr. Schlesinger taught economics at the University of Virginia. His 1960 book, “The Political Economy of National Security,” drew attention at the RAND Corporation, which hired him in 1963. He became director of strategic studies there in 1967.

CFR member Mr. Schlesinger joined the CFR packed Nixon administration in 1969 as assistant director of the Bureau of the Budget, and drew the CFR member president’s attention by challenging a Pentagon weapons proposal in his presence.

In 1971, Nixon named him chairman of the Atomic Energy Commission, formed after World War II to promote nuclear energy. Over time, critics said, the commission fell under the industry’s sway. CFR member Mr. Schlesinger favored atomic power, but said it raised legitimate environmental concerns. He ordered overhauls, including a new division of environmental and safety affairs, and set the commission on a course to “serve the public interest.”

In February 1973, CFR member Mr. Schlesinger was named director of Central Intelligence, succeeding CFR member Richard Helms, who had been fired by Nixon for refusing to block the Watergate investigation. His five-month C.I.A. tenure was stormy. He was appalled to learn that agents prohibited from spying on Americans had carried out domestic break-ins for the White House. He purged 1,000 of 17,000 employees and ordered a sweeping investigation into past operations.

That investigation eventually turned up evidence of widespread illegality. (The findings were not made public until 2007, and then were heavily censored.) But the inquiry had barely begun when, in July 1973, Nixon chose CFR member Mr. Schlesinger for the Pentagon job, replacing CFR member Elliot Richardson, who became attorney general.

In recent years he was a trustee of the Center for Strategic and International Studies, a Washington research organization, and chairman of the Mitre Corporation. He wrote no autobiography, but synthesized much of his experience in a 1989 book, “America at Century’s End.”

Correction: March 27, 2014

An earlier version of this obituary misspelled the given name of James R. Schlesinger’s predecessor as secretary of defense. He was Elliot Richardson, not Eliot

All versions of the NYT obituary failed to make any reference to the Council on Foreign Relations.

 

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  1. Pingback: Council on Foreign Relations Member James R. Schlesinger and the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) | tomjefferson1976 | Defending Sanity in the Uppity Down World

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